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Air Force set to launch next-to-last GPS IIF satellite

A close-up image of a Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite as it sits atop its payload adapter awaiting final encapsulation within a four-meter diameter protective fairing Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A close-up image of a Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite as it sits atop its payload adapter awaiting final encapsulation within a four-meter diameter protective fairing Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite awaits final encapsulation within a four-meter diameter protective payload fairing Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite awaits final encapsulation within a four-meter diameter protective payload fairing Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite undergoes final encapsulation inside a four-meter diameter protective payload fairing Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite undergoes final encapsulation inside a four-meter diameter protective payload fairing Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

Technicians prepare to close up a Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite within a four-meter diameter protective payload fairing during final encapsulation Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

Technicians prepare to close up a Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite within a four-meter diameter protective payload fairing during final encapsulation Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A close-up image of a Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite as it undergoes final encapsulation Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A close-up image of a Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite as it undergoes final encapsulation Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A technician performs a check of a Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite within a four-meter diameter protective payload fairing during final encapsulation Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

A technician performs a check of a Global Positioning System IIF-series satellite within a four-meter diameter protective payload fairing during final encapsulation Oct. 16 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF will provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 30 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFS, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

The encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite is transported Oct. 21 for stacking atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 booster at the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

The encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite is transported Oct. 21 for stacking atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 booster at the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

The encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite prepares to be lifted Oct. 21 for stacking atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 booster at the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

The encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite prepares to be lifted Oct. 21 for stacking atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 booster at the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

The encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite is lifted Oct. 21 for stacking atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 booster at the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

The encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite is lifted Oct. 21 for stacking atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 booster at the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

Technicians lower and stack the encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite Oct. 21 atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle in the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)
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Technicians lower and stack the encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite Oct. 21 atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle in the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

Technicians attach the encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite Oct. 21 atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle in the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)
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Technicians attach the encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite Oct. 21 atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle in the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

Technicians finalize connections between the encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 21 in the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)
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Technicians finalize connections between the encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 21 in the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

Service platforms are removed from around the encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite stacked atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 21 in the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)
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Service platforms are removed from around the encapsulated GPS IIF-11 satellite stacked atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 21 in the Vertical Integration Facility near Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF satellites provide improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal (L5) that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications. The Air Force and its mission partners are scheduled to launch GPS IIF-11 from SLC-41 at CCAFS on Oct. 30. The launch window opens at 12:17 p.m. EDT and will remain open for 18 minutes. (Courtesy photo: United Launch Alliance)

Sunlight bathes an Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite encapsulated inside a 4-meter diameter payload shroud and stacked atop the booster as it prepares to roll out from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).
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Sunlight bathes an Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite encapsulated inside a 4-meter diameter payload shroud and stacked atop the booster as it prepares to roll out from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).

A Bird's eye view of an Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).
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A Bird's eye view of an Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).

A low angle view of the Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).
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A low angle view of the Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).

Appearing to rise out of the grass, an Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. The gray structure in the distance just to the left of the red construction crane is a new Crew Access Tower, currently nearing completion for future use by astronauts with the Boeing CST-100 manned spacecraft, slated for first flight in December 2017. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).
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Appearing to rise out of the grass, an Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. The gray structure in the distance just to the left of the red construction crane is a new Crew Access Tower, currently nearing completion for future use by astronauts with the Boeing CST-100 manned spacecraft, slated for first flight in December 2017. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).

A wide angle view of the Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. The gray structure in the distance just to the left of the red construction crane is a new Crew Access Tower, currently nearing completion for future use by astronauts with the Boeing CST-100 manned spacecraft, slated for first flight in December 2017. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).
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A wide angle view of the Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility to Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. The gray structure in the distance just to the left of the red construction crane is a new Crew Access Tower, currently nearing completion for future use by astronauts with the Boeing CST-100 manned spacecraft, slated for first flight in December 2017. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).

A pad view of the Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard at Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. The gray structure just to the left of the mobile launch platform is a new Crew Access Tower, currently nearing completion for future use by astronauts with the Boeing CST-100 manned spacecraft, slated for first flight in December 2017. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).
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A pad view of the Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard at Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. The gray structure just to the left of the mobile launch platform is a new Crew Access Tower, currently nearing completion for future use by astronauts with the Boeing CST-100 manned spacecraft, slated for first flight in December 2017. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).

A reverse angle view of the Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard at  Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. The gray structure with white mast just to the left of the mobile launch platform is a lightning tower used to protect the launch vehicle and satellite from Florida's notorious thunderstorms and lightning strikes. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).
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A reverse angle view of the Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with GPS IIF-11 satellite aboard at Space Launch Complex-41 in anticipation of a Saturday afternoon launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). This is the second to last GPS IIF launch in a series of 12 spacecraft. The gray structure with white mast just to the left of the mobile launch platform is a lightning tower used to protect the launch vehicle and satellite from Florida's notorious thunderstorms and lightning strikes. (Photo courtesy United Launch Alliance).

On Thursday, Oct. 29 during final launch preparations, a leak was discovered in a ground support equipment valve for the launch pad water suppression system. The valve was replaced and verification tests were successfully completed. Everything is progressing towards the GPS IIF-11 launch for the United States Air Force. The mission is set to lift off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket on Saturday, Oct. 31 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT) (Courtesy photo: ULA)
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On Thursday, Oct. 29 during final launch preparations, a leak was discovered in a ground support equipment valve for the launch pad water suppression system. The valve was replaced and verification tests were successfully completed. Everything is progressing towards the GPS IIF-11 launch for the United States Air Force. The mission is set to lift off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket on Saturday, Oct. 31 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT) (Courtesy photo: ULA)

On Thursday, Oct. 29 during final launch preparations, a leak was discovered in a ground support equipment valve for the launch pad water suppression system. The valve was replaced and verification tests were successfully completed. Everything is progressing towards the GPS IIF-11 launch for the United States Air Force. The mission is set to lift off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket on Saturday, Oct. 31 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT) (Courtesy photo: ULA)
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On Thursday, Oct. 29 during final launch preparations, a leak was discovered in a ground support equipment valve for the launch pad water suppression system. The valve was replaced and verification tests were successfully completed. Everything is progressing towards the GPS IIF-11 launch for the United States Air Force. The mission is set to lift off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket on Saturday, Oct. 31 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT) (Courtesy photo: ULA)

As the sun sets in the West Friday evening, everything is progressing towards the GPS IIF-11 launch for the United States Air Force. The mission is set to lift off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket on Saturday, Oct. 31 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT) (Courtesy photo: ULA)
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As the sun sets in the West Friday evening, everything is progressing towards the GPS IIF-11 launch for the United States Air Force. The mission is set to lift off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket on Saturday, Oct. 31 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT) (Courtesy photo: ULA)

As dusk settles into Friday evening, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with a Boeing-built GPS IIF-11 satellite encapsulated in its four-meter diameter protective fairing is seen in this mirror image at Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). (Courtesy photo: ULA)
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As dusk settles into Friday evening, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle with a Boeing-built GPS IIF-11 satellite encapsulated in its four-meter diameter protective fairing is seen in this mirror image at Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens Oct. 31 at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). (Courtesy photo: ULA)

Bathed during the night by a bank of xenon lights, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 with the GPS IIF-11 satellite stands ready for a Halloween afternoon liftoff on Oct. 31 at Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). (Courtesy photo: ULA)
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Bathed during the night by a bank of xenon lights, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 with the GPS IIF-11 satellite stands ready for a Halloween afternoon liftoff on Oct. 31 at Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT). (Courtesy photo: ULA)

LOS ANGELES AIR FORCE BASE, El Segundo, Calif. -- Air Force Space Command's Space and Missile Systems Center and its mission partners are scheduled to launch the 11th Boeing-built Global Positioning System's GPS IIF satellite aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 launch vehicle Oct. 31 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch window opens at 12:13 p.m. EDT (9:13 a.m. PDT) and will remain open for 19 minutes.

Ten GPS IIF satellites are currently on-orbit and meeting all mission requirements. Of the remaining satellites, GPS IIF-11 is awaiting launch and GPS IIF-12, the remaining IIF-series satellite, is in storage awaiting final processing and preparation for launch on Feb. 3, 2016.

GPS IIF satellites provide improved signals that will enhance the precise global positioning, navigation and timing services supporting both the warfighter and the growing civilian needs of our global economy. GPS IIF provides improved navigational accuracy through advanced atomic clocks, a longer design life than previous GPS satellites, and a third operational civil signal -- L5 -- that benefits commercial aviation and safety-of-life applications.

"The GPS IIF satellites play a key role in our modernization effort to provide new space-based capabilities for users around the globe and for decades to come," said Lt. Gen. Samuel Greaves, Space and Missile Systems Center commander and Air Force Program Executive Officer for Space. "We have successfully placed into operation 10 in a series of 12 procured Boeing-built space vehicles, and thanks to the exceptional team of government, industry and launch personnel we are poised to launch the 11th GPS IIF satellite aboard an Atlas V 401 launch vehicle later this week," he said.
 
Operated by AFSPC's 50th Space Wing at Schriever Air Force Base, located east of Colorado Springs, Colo., the GPS constellation provides precise positioning, navigation and timing services worldwide as a free service provided by the U.S. Air Force, seven days a week, 24-hours a day.

SMC, located at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, Calif., is the U.S. Air Force's center of acquisition excellence for acquiring and developing military space systems.  Its portfolio includes the Global Positioning System, military satellite communications, defense meteorological satellites, space launch and range systems, satellite control networks, space based infrared systems and space situational awareness capabilities.

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