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GPS Next-Generation Control Squadron Completes System Requirements Reviews

GPS is made up of three parts: satellites, ground stations, and receivers. The satellites act like the stars in constellations — we know where they are supposed to be at any given time within a small range of error. The satellites broadcast their location to the ground stations, and the ground stations are able to detect and correct that error in future uploads to the satellites. When the satellite’s location is more accurately broadcasted to the receivers, the receivers can calculate a more accurate position. A receiver, like you might find in your smartphone or navigation system in a car, is constantly listening for a signal from these satellites. The receiver figures out how far away they are from the satellites in view. Once the receiver calculates its distance from four or more satellites, it knows exactly where you are within a few yards of your actual location. (Courtesy graphic)

GPS is made up of three parts: satellites, ground stations, and receivers. The satellites act like the stars in constellations — we know where they are supposed to be at any given time within a small range of error. The satellites broadcast their location to the ground stations, and the ground stations are able to detect and correct that error in future uploads to the satellites. When the satellite’s location is more accurately broadcasted to the receivers, the receivers can calculate a more accurate position. A receiver, like you might find in your smartphone or navigation system in a car, is constantly listening for a signal from these satellites. The receiver figures out how far away they are from the satellites in view. Once the receiver calculates its distance from four or more satellites, it knows exactly where you are within a few yards of your actual location. (Courtesy graphic)

Los Angeles Air Force Base --

The GPS Next-Generation Control Segment (OCX) Squadron recently completed two System Requirements Reviews (SRR) with contractors Northrop Grumman Mission Systems and Raytheon Space Systems. Both contractors are under identical $160 million contracts administered by the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., for Phase A of the GPS OCX program. 

Raytheon conducted its SRR with the OCX program team in February, followed by Northrop Grumman's SRR in April. Both industry teams successfully demonstrated their full understanding of the requirements of the OCX program. 

During this phase, each contractor must successfully complete a System Requirements Review, Integrated Baseline Review, System Design Review and demonstrate their Modernized Capability Engineering Models (MCEM). The MCEM showcases design and production processes planned for future OCX block deliveries. 

The OCX architecture will advance the capabilities of current GPS technology by adding capabilities in Effects-Based Operations (EBO), Navigational Warfare (NAVWAR) and demonstrating Net-Centricity by integrating with the Global Information Grid (GIG). Each contributes a major advantage to the warfighter. In addition, OCX supports added functionality to civilian users of GPS technology. 

Down-select to a single OCX provider for the $2.7B effort is scheduled for May 2009.