HomeNewsArticle Display

Los Angeles Air Force Base Celebrates Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month

.  Chief Master Sergeant Justin Stoltzfus, Senior Enlisted Leader of the Los Angeles Garrison, left, and Colonel Becky Beers, Los Angeles Garrison commander, cut the cake to open Asian American Pacific Islander month.

. Chief Master Sergeant Justin Stoltzfus, Senior Enlisted Leader of the Los Angeles Garrison, left, and Colonel Becky Beers, Los Angeles Garrison commander, cut the cake to open Asian American Pacific Islander month.

. A lot of time and hard work went into planning and executing the month long events. This team organized all the activities starting with serving cake and Thai ice tea.

. A lot of time and hard work went into planning and executing the month long events. This team organized all the activities starting with serving cake and Thai ice tea.

One of the cakes which marked the observance of the month.

One of the cakes which marked the observance of the month.

Base member join in the opening ceremonies.

Base member join in the opening ceremonies.

LOS ANGELES AIR FORCE BASE -- During the month, Los Angeles Air Force Base has various events planned to celebrate the AAPI culture from cooking demonstrations to Taekwondo classes. The celebration kicked off last week with a cake cutting.

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month, celebrated throughout the month of May, honors the generations of Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Native Hawaiians who contributed and continue to contribute to the success of this nation.

In 1978, a joint congressional resolution established Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week. In 1992, Congress expanded the observance to a month long celebration, now known as Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

The Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Island cultures lend to the diversity that makes our nation stand apart from many others. Encompassing a wide range of countries and nationalities, the Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Island communities represent over 50 distinct ethnicities and languages within the United States.